Gardening for your survival (Part 1)

gardening for survival

Spring has sprung—at least south of the northern tier of states where snow still has a ban on it—and the grass has ‘riz. And so has the price of most foods, which is particularly devastating just now when so many Americans are unemployed, underemployed, retired or retiring, on declining or fixed incomes and are having to choose between paying their mortgages, credit card bills, car payments, and medical and utility bills and eating enough and healthily. Many are eating more fast food, prepared foods, junk food—all of which are also becoming more expensive—or less food.

In some American towns, and not just impoverished backwaters, as many as 30 percent of residents can’t afford to feed themselves and their families sufficiently, let alone nutritiously. Here in the Piedmont Triad of North Carolina where I live it’s 25 percent. Across the country one out of six of the elderly suffers from malnutrition and hunger. And the number of children served one or two of their heartiest, healthiest meals by their schools grows annually as the number of them living at poverty levels tops twenty percent. Thirty-seven million Americans rely on food banks that now routinely sport half-empty shelves and report near-empty bank accounts. And this is a prosperous nation!

In some cases this round of price hikes on everything from cereal and steak to fresh veggies and bread—and even the flour that can usually be bought cheaply to make it— will be temporary. But over the long term the systems that have provided most Americans with a diversity, quantity and quality of foods envied by the rest of the world are not going to be as reliable as they were.

What’s for Supper Down the Road?

As they move through the next few decades Americans can expect

  • the price of conventionally produced food to rise and not come down again,
  • prices to rollercoaster so that budgeting is unpredictable,
  • some foods to become very expensive compared to what we’re used to
  • and others, beginning with some of the multiple versions of the same thing made by the same company to garner a bigger market share and more shelf space, to gradually become unavailable.

Tremors in food supply chains and pricing will make gardening look like a lot more than a hobby, a seasonal workout, a practical way to fill your pantry with your summer favorites, or a physically, spiritually and mentally healing activity, or all four. Gardening and small-scale and collective farming, especially of staple crops and the ones that could stave off malnutrition, could become as important as bringing home the bacon, both the piggy and the dollar kind. Why?

There are at least five reasons why more of us should take up spade, rake and hoe, make compost and raise good soil and garden beds with a vengeance…Read Gardening for your survival (Part 2).

Source: Energy Bulletin (Ellen LaConte)

As we approach Autumn in South Africa, now is the time to start preparing a vegetable garden (our Summer months are often too hot for many types of vegetables).  If you have a big piece of land available for cultivation, your choice of food crops can include maize and cereal crops in addition to various vegetables.  However, should you not be fortunate enough to own enough suitable land, potted vegetables can be very productive.  You need not grow numerous different vegetables and fruit; concentrate on the types that will do well in your particular circumstances.  This is where you should encourage other people in your community to start producing food- you can use your excess crop to barter for fruit and vegetables that you don’t grow.  Consider harvesting rainwater and grey water for irrigation.  Having enough water is obviously essential for successful vegetable gardening.  Rainwater harvesting and greywater recycling can lead to water self-sufficiency, depending on a few factors.  Gardening for self-sufficiency is very rewarding and perhaps, one day, your life just might depend on it.

Water Rhapsody Water Conservation Systems has incorporated Yes Solar Mpumalanga so that we can offer solar water heating systems to further reduce your environmental impact (water and energy are linked).  Yes Solar is a distributor for Solsquare Solar Solutions- high quality German-engineered solar energy systems that are competitively priced.  Solsquare solar geysers are SABS- and Eskom-approved and are fitted by qualified, Eskom-accredited solar installers.   Now is the time to install a solar geyser while the Eskom rebates last (this money will run out eventually) and before the looming energy crisis arrives.  Solar water geysers can reduce household electricity costs by up to 50%.

Water Rhapsody’s WWF AWARD-winning water conservation systems (see product demo) include rainwater harvesting systems, grey water recycling systems, swimming pool backwash recycling, water-saving toilet flushing mechanisms and rainwater tanks (we are authorized  JoJo Water Tanks & Atlas Plastics water tank dealers in Mpumalanga and Limpopo- best water tank prices in the Lowveld!).  Two new industrial water recycling products have been added to our water system lineup, read about the Poseidon Advantage & Poseidon 1500.

Our water and solar systems will save the environment while you save money on water and electricity bills; get free water and free water heating!

Contact us for a free quote on a solar geyser, water system, rain water tank or water tank.  Reduce your carbon footprint by switching to green insurance, now available in South Africa.

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