Tag Archives | water tariffs

South Africa: Agri SA comments on new water tariffs

In its commentary on the Department of Water Affairs’ approved water tariffs for the 2012/2013 financial year, Agri SA said the newly released water tariff dispensation contained various positive aspects, amongst others the fact that it has not applied the maximum allowable increases. However, the organisation believes that the pricing strategy should be revised as […]

Read full story Comments are closed

Water Crisis: The Future of Water in China

Water, water, everywhere but not really in China. Though an important strategic resource, it has always been in short supply and wasted aplenty, without much thought for its conservation. But two recent government announcements may well prove the old adage wrong.

Read full story Comments are closed

‘Water poverty’ to rise in the UK as scarcity pushes up bills

“Water poverty” will become the new fuel poverty for an increasing number of households as scarcity of water supply pushes up bills, according to an influential thinktank that says Britain must deal urgently with climate change. Four million British households already ‘water poor’ as climate change and increased demand lead to higher tariffs A report […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

Pricing of water should reflect infrastructure costs

Infrastructure degradation, water inefficiency, backlogs in providing access to basic water services, wastage and problems such as acid mine drainage were exacerbating water scarcity in South Africa, and would pose binding constraints on the economy, said Nedbank chief economist Dennis Dykes. Speaking at the inaugural South African Water and Energy forum in Sandton, he said […]

Read full story Comments { 0 }

‘Blue Drop’ water quality scheme gains momentum, but critics say more is needed

Water quality and availability have become matters of growing concern in South Africa. The yearly renewable freshwater supply per capita currently stands at between 1 000 m3 and 1 700 m3, but this will likely shrink to less than 500 m³ by 2025, according to the World Resources Institute.

Read full story Comments are closed